India

680m

people are unable to meet their own essential needs

287m

adults are illiterate

40%

of children under three years old are malnourished

12.6m

children are working as child labourers

About India

India is the largest democracy in the world with a population of over 1.2 billion. It is a multicultural nation with diverse ethnic groups. Although its people are deeply religious, representing various religions, it is a secular country with freedom for all to practise their faith, as written in the constitution.

The nation has one of the highest levels of poverty in South Asia (based on income, education, health and a number of other factors). There are 440 million people living under this ‘multidimensional’ poverty in India’s eight poorest states alone. Social divisions, frequent disasters and a lack of sustainable income opportunities add to a growing problem of huge income disparity.

While India is listed among the middle income countries of the world, it is common to see sprawling slum dwellings near wealthy residential and business locations. Rural to urban migration is exerting a phenomenal stress on the existing infrastructure in cities.

India shares a common geoclimatic region with Nepal, Myanmar, Bhutan and Bangladesh and is highly susceptible to natural disasters like earthquakes and flooding.

How we do it

Livelihoods

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Disaster Risk Reduction

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Vulnerable People

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Resilience

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Our Work in India

Tearfund partners work with communities to help them develop secure and productive livelihoods. Farmers are trained in more robust forms of sustainable agriculture. This means that people have access to sufficient nutritious food all year round even in times of crisis and disaster.

Thousands of people have benefited from joining small scale community savings groups (known as ‘self-help groups’). These reduce dependency on moneylenders and enable people to overcome poverty and food insecurity. The groups also encourage members to set up small businesses making and growing goods and produce. Members are also linked to local markets to help them sell these items at good prices.

Through its partners, Tearfund has helped with the formation of disaster management committees within disaster-prone villages. These committees improve the community’s capacity to cope when disasters like earthquakes or floods strike.

Tearfund is committed to reducing child trafficking in vulnerable areas, working with our local partner organisation and a network of other agencies and government authorities. Communities are equipped to resist the advances of traffickers through awareness-raising, the formation of vigilance groups and economic empowerment.

ACHIEVEMENTS

2,000

farmers have been trained in climate-smart agricultural techniques.

110

villages are using child-protection strategies to combat human trafficking.

214

self-help groups have been established and linked with local markets.

Pray for our work

  • Pray for women and children trapped in human trafficking, often with no hope of being rescued.
  • Pray for partner staff, who often work in difficult and dangerous situations, to be able to end any form of human trafficking they encounter.
  • Pray for communities affected by natural disasters, that they can become more resilient to them and better able to quickly rebuild their livelihoods.

Stories from India

  • Fifty years, fifty countries: India

    Famine was declared in the Indian state of Bihar on 20 April 1967, followed by catastrophic floods. An emergency call to the Evangelical Alliance from Dr Ben Wati of the Evangelical Fellowship of India (EFI) was one of the triggers that led to the formation of Tearfund.

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  • South Asia floods, people wait for clinic

    South Asian floods two months later

    During the flooding in Bangladesh, Bibha’s house was washed away. With her family she managed to take shelter in a neighbouring house. Both she and her eldest daughter fell sick with a fever. With the roads destroyed around Kurigram she had no way to get to the health centre to get help. Bibha’s husband is a labourer, but during monsoon season he doesn’t have any work and the whole family has to survive on only one meal a day. Now their circumstances had become much worse.

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Where we're working